Dating in latin american culture

D., is at the center of the city of Uxmal in the Yucatan.

Known as the Pyramid of the Magician or Sorcerer, it was (according to Maya legend) built by the god of magic, Itzamná, as a training center for shamans, healers and priests. 1100, the 180-square-foot Castillo was constructed over another temple-pyramid built 100 years earlier.

Teotihuacán also contains a smaller stepped, stone-covered temple-pyramid called the Temple of the Feathered Serpent (an early form of the Aztec god Quetzalcoatl). Teotihuacán declined between the seventh and 10th centuries and was eventually abandoned.

The Maya, another dominant civilization of Mesoamerica, made temple-pyramids the glorious centers of their great stone cities.

However, more recent excavations have unearthed evidence that some pyramids did include tombs, and there is also evidence that city-states used the pyramids for military defense.

The most famous single pyramid in Latin America is the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacán, Mexico.

Underneath its ruins, the remains of six earlier pyramids were later found, evidence of the constant rebuilding process common to the Mesoamerican pyramids.

At one point, historians concluded that (in contrast with Egyptian pyramids), pre-Columbian pyramids were not intended as burial chambers but as homes for deities.

The elaborate nature of Aztec pyramids and other architecture was also connected to the Aztec’s warrior culture: The Aztec symbol for conquest was a burning pyramid, with a conqueror destroying the temple at its top.

Tenochtitlan, the great Aztec capital, housed the Great Pyramid, a four-stepped structure some 60 meters high.

Constructed from adobe in four stages of construction beginning around the second century B.

C., the Pyramid of Cholula measured 1,083 by 1,034 feet at the base and was about 82 feet high.

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